Ancient wisdom for today's ultrarunners

Are you or someone you know training for an ultra?Angie Kociolek of Rootstock Acupuncture Bozeman treats runners

Outside Bozeman just published my article about the importance

of moderation and prevention as part of a wise training approach. 

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Summer: Balancing the energetic and lazy aspects of the season

It's official! I just heard my first ruby-crowned kinglet. We are entering the most yang, sunny, energizing phase of the year. Summer is here!

Joyful signs of the season!

I, like many, thrive in this time of the year - running, hiking and biking more. Gardening. Adventuring. Ingesting colorful eye candy otherwise known as flowers, foliage, birds, bees, snakes, mushrooms... I love it all!sun heart

I’m a planner by nature - having something to look forward to on the calendar is half the fun for me. That said, I also see the value in creating a balance of planned activities AND room for spontaneity – offering me the choice to be energetic or enjoy the concept of long, lazy days of summer.

Running-wise, I’m considering trying something a little different this summer - running for the pure pleasure of it with no obligation. Rather than sign up for a race that requires long training runs that eat up my free time, maybe I'll volunteer for the Ridge Run which has become an annual tradition in our

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Chinese medicine for ultrarunners

There will be no shortage of ultrarunners training in and around Southwest Montana this spring with three of the big “local” races already full - the 2016 Bighorn Mountain Wild & Scenic Trail Run 100 MilerThe Rut 50K, and The Devil’s Backbone 50 Miler.

The challenge for many will entail not only the obvious physical and mental demands of ultrarunning, but the commitment to train with a balanced approach. Consider two major themes of Chinese medicine: Moderation and prevention.running mountains

It’s not always easy to know when enough is enough
“Is it possible to love this sport too much?” was the question posed in the June 2015 Outside Magazine article on overtraining syndrome (OTS).1 As far back as 1990, scientific research articles existed on the subject of overtraining and there was a consensus that “undertraining is better than overtraining, and this seems to be the surest way of avoiding prolonged fatigue.”2 I’m not debating whether “fatigue” is synonymous with “OTS” but for the middle-of-the-pack runner like myself there is little difference.

My run

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